SVP Universal Cosmology
Addendum 11

Russell's Laws and Principles

 

"A truth's initial commotion is directly proportional to how deeply the lie was believed. It wasn't the world being round that agitated people, but that the world wasn't flat. When a well-packaged web of lies has been sold gradually to the masses over generations, the truth will seem utterly preposterous and its speaker a raving lunatic."
~~~Dresden James

[updated 06/10/09]
Dale Pond, 2007, 2008, 2009
Delta Spectrum Research
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La Junta, Colorado 81050
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(This is an incomplete presentation. Not every item is as it will be in the final version of these documents. Until the final version is published use the information presented herein at your own risk. In the meantime please peruse the SVP Recommended Reading List for additional background information.)
Section Parts and Addenda

Part 01 - General View
Part 02 - Origin of Polar States

Part 03 - Polarity Manifests as Rotating Vortex

Part 04 - Rotation on Three Planes

Part 05 - Three Rotating Planes Become Spheres

Part 06 - Formation of Cubes

Part 07 - Origin and Formation of Matter

Part 7B - Formation of Matter
Part 08 - Sympathetic Streams and 3-D Matter

Part 09 - What Vibration Is.
Part 1 & Part 2
Part 10 - What Sympathy Is

Part 11 - SVP Music Model

Part 12 - Russell's Locked Potentials

Part 13 - Rotation from Vibration/Oscillation

Part 14 - Keely's Mysterious Thirds, Sixths and Ninths

Part 15 - Dissociating Water Acoustically

Part 16 - Electricity and Magnetism

Part 17 - Gravity

Part 18 - Mind, an Engineerable Force
Part 19 - Musical Dynasphere, Historical
Part 20 - Musical Dynasphere, Current Development
Part 21 - Pantone's GEET Reactor Dynamics

- - - - - - - - - - - - - Addenda - - - - - - - - - - - -
01 - Bjerknes Effect
02 - Chart of Locked Potentials
03 - Ether
04 - Origin of Matter
05 - Indig Numbers
06 - One Phase of Keely's Discoveries...
07 - Pond's Original Notes on the Scale______
08 - Laws of Being
09 - Table of the Elements
10 - Keely's Forty Laws
11 - Russell's Laws and Principles
12 - What Electricity Is.
13 - Puharich, Water Dissociation via AC
14 - As a Man Thinketh
15 - Genero-Radiative Concept
16 - The Action of Force is Spiro-Vortex
17 - Russell's Optic Dynamo-Generator
18 - Etheric Vibratory Scale
96 - Index of ebooks
97
Disclaimer
98 - Footnotes
99 - Definitions


 
The following laws and principles governing mind, matter and energy are from Walter Russell's book: The Universal One. The numbers at right are page numbers in the original text.

NEW LAWS AND PRINCIPLES

01. The material substance of Mind cannot evade its materialization into the form desired by Mind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
02. The whole idea of all things is in the seed of all things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
03. All thinking is creating that which it is thinking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
04. All idea, and all forms of idea are the result of union between equal or unequal opposite actions and reactions of force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
05. Unions of opposed actions and reactions are possible only within certain limitations. When union does not take place there can be no reproduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
06. Equal and opposite actions and reactions, when united, are satisfied in their unions and will remain united . . . . . .28
07. Stable unions will always reproduce true to species . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
08. Unequal and opposite actions and reactions, when united, are unsatisfied in their unions and will always seek their true tonal mates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
09. Unstable unions never reproduce true to species . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
10. Unstable unions tend to return to their separate tonal states . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
11. If either mate in an unstable union finds a more equal mate, it will always leave the former and go to the latter . . . . . 28
12. No idea of Mind has place or position in time or space. All idea is universal . . . . 30
13. All mass is regenerated by absorption of the impacting radio-active energy of all other mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
14. All mass is degenerated by its own radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
15. All mass is generated by accumulation of the universal constant of energy into higher potential . . . . . . . . . . . .31
16. That which is generated must be radiated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
17. All opposite effects of motion are simultaneous in their expression . . . . . . . 32
18. The coefficient of cold for an expanded volume of mass of low pressure and potential becomes the coefficient of heat for the same mass in a contracted volume of higher pressure and higher potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
19. In any wave the induction current seeks the high pressure at the apex of its cone of energy and the conductive current seeks the low pressure at its base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
20. Everything that is, is of everything else that is. Nothing is of itself alone. All created things are indissolubly united . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
21. There are no unconditioned facts of matter in a universe of motion. There are but appearances of facts . . . . . . . . . .47
22. The greater the pressure the higher the freezing point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
23. The lesser the pressure the lower the freezing point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
24. No state of motion ever began or ever ended . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
25. All mass is both electric and magnetic . 67
26. All mass simultaneously expresses both opposites of all effects of motion, and each opposite is cumulatively preponderant in sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
27. All electro-magnetic mass forms into systems of units which revolve in spiral or bits both centripetally toward and centrifugally away from nucleal centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
28. All preponderantly charging systems are positive systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
29. All preponderantly discharging systerns are negative systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
30. All preponderantly contracting systems are positive systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
31. All preponderantly expanding systems are negative systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
32. All systems whose spirals are preponderantly closing spirals are positive systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
33. All systems whose spirals are preponderantly opening spirals are negative systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
34. All systems of preponderantly lessening volume are positive systems . . . . . . . 67
35. All systems of preponderantly increasing volume are negative systems . . . 67
36. All systems of preponderantly increasing potential are positive systems . . 67
37. All systems of preponderantly lowering potential are negative systems . . . . . . 67
38. All preponderantly integrating systems are positive systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
39. All preponderantly disintegrating systems are negative systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
40. All preponderantly generating systems are positive systems . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
41. All preponderantly radiating systems are negative systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
42. All preponderantly heating systems are positive systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
43. All preponderantly cooling systems are negative systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
44. Electricity attracts, magnetism repels.. . . . . . . . . 74
45. Electricity and magnetism move in opposite directions, their departure from each other being at 180. . . . . . . . . 74
46. Electric lines of force approach each other at 180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
47. Magnetic lines of force depart from the line of direction of electric force and also of magnetic force at 180 . . . . . 74
48. Electric energy reproduces itself by induction and dissipates itself by conduction, at an angle of 90 to the lines of direction of induction and conduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
49. All mass is potential out of place, and all mass constantly seeks the proper pressure zone for its constantly changing potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
50. Positive charge attracts positive charge and expels negative discharge . . . . . . . . .77
51. Negative discharge repels both negative discharge and positive charge . . . . . 77
52. The union of an action with its reaction is always followed by the reproduction of separate actions and reactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
53. All mass is generated and regenerated by a contractive pressure exerted in the direction of its gravitative center. Its minimum of generative pressure is exerted from its equatorial plane and its maximum pressure from its pole.
54. All mass is radiated and diffused by an expansive pressure exerted in the direction of its surface. Its minimum of radiative pressure is exerted from its pole and its maximum from its equatorial plane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
55. The generation of all energy is accomplished only through the resistance exerted against the direction of the force of any established motion . . . . . 114
56. X in power-time dimension is the square root of X in speed-time distance-area dimension and its cube root in volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
57. The radiation of all energy is accomplished only by the assistance, exerted in the direction of the force, of any established motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
58. High potential is generated from low potential against an accumulating pressure resistance equal, in inverse ratio, to the cube of the equilibrium pressure of the low potential, and is degenerated with equal pressure assistance in direct ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
59. All motion begins in the plus, contractive, endothermic impulse of thinking, and ends in the succeeding minus, expansive, exothermic impulse . . . . . . . . . . 117
60. In any mass a change in temperature is in inverse ratio to a change in volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
61. The greater the positive charge, the greater the pressure of contraction . . . . . . . 121
62. The greater the pressure of contraction, the less the volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
63. The greater the negative discharge, the greater the pressure of expansion . . . . . 121
64. The greater the pressure of expansion, the less the volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
65. Every pressure develops an exactly equal and opposite resisting pressure . . . . 124
66. In every mass, the attraction of the accumulating pressure and the repulsion of the distributing pressure exert their forces in opposite directions . . . . . . . 126
67. In any mass the lifting capacity, in relation to high potential, is equal to the compression capacity in relation to low potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
68. The degeneration of any mass is exactly balanced by the regeneration of another mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
69. Every mass has the relative apparent ability to attract and to repel every other mass, its relative ability depending on its relative potential . . . . . . . . . . . 127
70. Every body attracts and repels every other body with a force which increases and decreases in the universal ratios in accordance with its potential position and according to whether the direction of the mass is toward the north or toward the south . . . . . . . . . . 127
71. Any compound mass of varying plane will eventually separate into its constituents, each of which will find its true position in its own plane and pressure zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
72. In any mass its constant of centripetal force is its constant of power to attract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
73. In any mass its constant of centrifugal force is its constant of power to repel . . 132
74. Increase in density means decrease in axial of speed-time dimension and increase in orbital of power-time . . . . . . . .133
75. Activity never lessens and inactivity never increases because of any change of dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
76. Every expression of motion has its equal and opposite expression . . . . . . . 134
77. There can be no increase or decrease in any effect of motion without a balancing increase or decrease in its opposite effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
78. The power to attract lessens as volume increases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
79. The power to repel also lessens as volume increases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
80. In any mass the decrease in volume is in exact proportion to the increase in its potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
81. In any mass the decrease in volume is in exact proportion to the increase in positive charge, contraction pressure and temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
82. In any mass the greater its speed of revolution, the greater its power to attract and to repel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
83. In any mass the greater its speed of rotation, the less its power to attract and to repel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
84. All mass is simultaneously electric and magnetic, but preponderantly one or the other cumulatively in endless repeative sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
85. All mass simultaneously revolves and rotates though one effect is always preponderant while the other one is preparing for its right of preponderance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
86. All opposite effects of motion are simultaneous in the expression of their sex opposition but preponderant in sequence in each sex expression . . . . . . 135
87. All idea is repeative and no effect of motion once started ever ends . . . . . . . . . 135
88. The relative ability of a substance to attract and to repel is in the same ratio as the increase or decrease of the opposing pressures and other dimensions which determine the potential of a charging or discharging system . . . . . 138
89. In any mass the apparent ability to attract increases with increase of positive charge and decrease of volume; also the apparent ability to repel increases with increase of negative discharge and decrease of volume . . . . . . . . 138
90. In any mass the preponderance of the apparent ability to attract or to repel is proportionate to its preponderance of positive charge or negative discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
91. In any mass increase of positive charge is accompanied by increase of negative discharge in universal ratio until the conductivity of negative discharge exceeds the inductivity of positive charge, in accordance with the universal law of sequential preponderance of all opposite effects of motion . . . 140
92. All mass constantly runs the entire gamut of every dimension of the wave of energy of which it is a swirling part, until it has run the entire cycle represented by that wave . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
93. No mass can remain fixed in position, not even that which has been apparently arrested in its motion . . . . . . . . . . . 142
94. There is a true position for every potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
95. Every change of dimension in a mass changes all the dimensions in the mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
96. Accelerated revolution charges. Charging bodies attract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
97. Accelerated rotation discharges. Discharging bodies repel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
98. The ability of one mass to attract another depends upon the relative positive charge of each and its relative position in respect to other masses . . . . . 146
99. The ability of one mass to repel another depends upon the relative negative discharge of each and its relative position in respect to other masses . . . . . 146
100. The cycle of a wave is an orderly progression in the universal direction from south to north by the way of east, and back again to south by the way of west . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
101. All masses revolve from the west toward the east around the nucleal centers of their systems throughout the entire cycle of their waves . . . . . . . . 149
102. All masses rotate upon axes throughout the entire cycle of their waves from the west toward the east of their masses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
103. Form in motion is a reflection of concept in inertia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
104. All direction is an effect of gravitation and radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
105. All gravitative effects are electrically dominated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
106. All gravitative effects are the result of inhalation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
107. All radiative effects are magnetically dominated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
108. All radiative effects are the result of exhalation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
109. Electricity moves always in the direction of north, by the way of east . . . 154
110. Magnetism moves always south, by the way of west . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
111. In every mass the maximum exertion of the easterly force of contraction is within the charging areas of the generative cones of which the pole of rotation is the axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
112. In every mass the maximum exertion of the westerly force of expansion is within the discharging areas of the radiative cones of which the equator is the base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
113. Contraction is centripetal and expansion is centrifugal . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
114. The increase of centripetal force of any mass is in the direction of generation, and the increase of centrifugal force is in the direction of radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
115. Centripetal force accumulates and centrifugal force dissipates . . . . . . . . . . 156
116. Mass is accumulated in the direction of its generation, and dissipated in the direction of its radiation . . . . . . . . . . 156
117. Centripetal force decelerates rotation and accelerates revolution . . . . . . . . 156
118. Centrifugal force accelerates rotation and decelerates revolution . . . . . . . . 156
119. The deceleration of rotation is in the direction of generation and deceleration of revolution is in the direction of radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
120. All vortices turn from west to east and their apices point to north . . . . . . . . 156
121. All dimensions contract in the direction of electric force and expand in the direction of magnetic force in universal ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
122. Every effort of motion which is added to must be equally subtracted from . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
123. Every plus pressure total must be balanced by a minus one to maintain a system in equilibrium . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
124. All temperature dimensions of expanding mass increase in their expansion dimension, registering greater cold, and decrease in their contraction dimension, registering greater heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
125. The seven tones of the universal constant are consecutively removed, one from the other, the square of the distance to the next highest potential. The energy of each of the four units is exactly equal to that of each of the others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
126. All dimensions are pressure dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
127. All dimensions simultaneously expand and contract in opposite directions of the same ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
128. Expansion pressure is in direct ratio to the square of the distance, area, plane, orbit or time unit, and to the cube of the volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
129. Contraction pressure is in inverse ratio to the square of the distance, area, plane, orbit or time unit, and to the cube of the volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
130. Every mass in the universe occupies a measurable potential position . . . . . . . 162
131. Every particle of matter in this universe is connected with every other particle of matter by electric charging poles which are the controls of opposing electro-magnetic cones of energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
132. The nearer to the axis and to the apex of the cone the greater the density, temperature, pressure, potential, power-time and all effects of electro-positive preponderance . . . . . . . 168
133. The nearer the base of the cone the greater the tenuity, the speed-time and the tendency to ionize, and the lower the temperature, pressure, potential and all effects of electronegative preponderance . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
134. The apparent relative ability of mass to attract and to repel is governed by the contraction of its polar magnetic bases and the expansion of its ecliptic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
135. The greater the expansion of the ecliptic and the greater the diameters of precessional orbits, the less the ability of a mass to attract and to repel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
136. The less the expansion of the ecliptic, and the less the diameters of the precessional orbits, the greater the ability of a mass to attract and to repel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
137. In any mass the diameters of its polar magnetic bases and of its axial precessional orbits increase as the mass recedes from, and decrease as it approaches its nucleal sun's equatorial plane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
138. In any mass the expansion of its ecliptic, the diameters of its equatorial precessional orbits and of its polar magnetic bases increase as the mass recedes from, and decrease as it approaches its nucleal sun's equatorial plane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
139. In any mass, north is the gravitativeradiative center where the apparent ability to attract and to repel is at its maximum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
140. South is an extension of the equa torial plane which divides any mass. It is that part of mass where radiative emanations are at their maximum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
141. In any mass the area of its ecliptic expansion, the areas of its polar magnetic bases, and the positions of its charging poles are governed by the oblateness of the mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
142. In any mass as oblateness decreases, polar magnetic bases and ecliptic expansion decrease their areas, and charging poles draw closer to its pole of rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
143. All motion appears in mass and disappears in plane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
144. The evolution of mass from plane to sphere and its diffusion back to plane are by the way of the cone . . . . . . . . . . . 184
145. The greater the complexity of any state of motion, the greater the interval of reproduction of that state of motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
146. The reproductive speed of generoactive light decreases in lowering octaves in inverse universal ratio, and radio-active speed increases in lowering octaves in direct ratio . . . . . . . . . . 187
147. The lower the potential, the greater the speed of reproduction . . . . . . . . . . . 187
148. Every effect of motion in any octave is repeated in sequence in the various speeds of every other octave . . . . . 187
149. Every effect of motion is cumulative and repeative within its accumulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
150. Displacement and replacement are universally simultaneous . . . . . . . . . . . 188
151. An action calculated to displace is simultaneously accompanied by a reaction to replace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
152. All gravitational and radiational expressions are simultaneous in their opposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
153. All effects of motion are simultaneously opposed, but their repeative acts are sequential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
154. Contracting, generating bodies decelerate the speed of rotation of inner planets by proximity . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
155. Deceleration of rotation of the planets of a system increases the surface tension pressure of a system . . . . . . . . . 191
156. The greater the deceleration of rotation, the greater the centripetal force of contraction pressure . . . . . . . . . 191
157. Acceleration of rotation of the planets of a system decreases the surface tension pressure of a system . . . . . . . . . 191
158. The opposites of all effects of motion vary in the opposites of their several dimensions in the direct and the inverse of the universal ratios . . . . . . . . . . . 193
159. Time and power appear by lengthening the day and shortening the year, and disappear by reversing these effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
160. Heating bodies approach each other and recede from cooling bodies . . . . . . . . 194
161. Expanding bodies recede from expanding and from contracting bodies . . . .194
162. Cooling bodies recede from cooling and from heating bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
163. Expanding bodies seek lower pressure equilibriums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
164. Contracting bodies seek higher pressure equilibriums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
165. Heating bodies charge. Charging bodies raise potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
166. Cooling bodies discharge. Dischargeing bodies lower potential . . . . . . . . . . . 194
167. Radiating and radiated bodies seek equilibrium positions in lower pressure zones appropriate to their lowered potentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
168. The greater the resistance of opposing pressures, the higher the melting point of a mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
169. The less the resistance of opposing pressures, the lower the melting point of a mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
170. Every effect of motion is cumulative and repeative within its accumulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
171. Every effect of motion in any octave is repeated in sequence in the various speeds of every other octave . . . . . . 202
172. In every wave the constant of its cone volume in inertia is the constant of the volume of all masses in motion within the wave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
173. In any mass the speed of rotation of bound energy increases in the direct universal ratio from the gravitative center of force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
174. In any system the speed of revolu tion of separated equal masses of bound energy revolving in the same plane, decreases in the inverse universal ratio from the center of force . . . 216
175. In any system accelerated revolution increases power-time dimension and accelerated rotation increases speedtime dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
176. In any mass decelerated rotation increases power-time dimension and decelerated revolution increases speed-time dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
177. In any mass or system the decrease in rotation or revolution is in inverse universal ratio and is balanced by a corresponding increase of the opposite effect in direct ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
178. The greater the resistance the greater the generation of power and the less its dissipation in speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
179. The less the resistance the less the generation of power and the greater its dissipation in speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
180. The greater the resistance to an ac tion offeree the greater the generoactivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
181. The greater the genero-activity the greater the power of mass to absorb heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
182. The less the resistance to the reaction of force, the greater the radioactivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
183. The greater the radioactivity the greater the power of mass to give out its heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
184. All mass rolls along the floors of space upon that part of its surface where radiation is at a maximum . . . . . . 224
185. Every equal area of the orbit of any mass must be covered in an equal interval of time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
186. The greater the inclination of any conic section to the base of the cone, the greater the eccentricity of an orbit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
187. The acceleration of attraction is always toward the perihelion of an orbit and the deceleration of repulsion is always toward its aphelion . . . . . . . . . .234
188. In any mass the aphelion of every orbit is the point of maximum exhalation and the beginning of inhalation . . 234
189. In any mass the perihelion of every orbit is the point of maximum inhalation and the beginning of exhalation . . 234
190. The interval of time between one exhalation-inhalation of any mass is the standard unit year of that mass . . . . . 234
191. The greater the angle of the reflecting plane of forming mass to the plane of concept in inertia, the greater the positive charge and negative discharge of that mass and consequently the greater its ability to appear to attract and to repel . . . . . . . 239
192. Preponderance of power of mass to appear to attract increases as the refleeting plane progresses through the tonal positions of 1 + 2 + and 3 + to its maximum at 4++ . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
193. Preponderance of power of mass to appear to repel increases as the reflecting plane progresses through the tonal positions of 1 — 2 — and 3 — to its maximum at 4++ . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
194. The greater the expansion of the ecliptic plane area of forming mass the less the positive charge and negative discharge of that mass and consequently the less its ability to appear to attract and repel . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
195. Preponderance of power of mass to appear to attract and to repel increases as expansion of ecliptic plane area decreases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
196. In any mass the lower the octave the higher the potential and the slower the speed of reproduction of any effect of motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
197. In any mass the higher the octave the lower the potential and the greater the speed of reproduction of any effect of motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
198. In any mass the lower the octave the greater the wave dimension and the Tower its tonal registration in sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
199. In any mass the higher the octave the smaller the wave dimension and the higher its tonal registration in sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249